Abode at Great Kneighton

  • © Proctor and Matthews Architects
  • © Proctor and Matthews Architects
  • © Tim Crocker Photography
  • © Tim Crocker Photography
  • © Tim Crocker Photography
  • © Tim Crocker Photography
  • © Tim Crocker Photography
  • © Tim Crocker Photography
  • © Tim Crocker Photography
  • © Tim Crocker Photography

Special Award

National Panel Special Award

Application Type

Civic Trust Awards

Level of Award

Special Award

Region

Eastern

Local Authority Area

Cambridge

Information about this scheme

The scheme consists of over 300 homes arranged as a sequence of spaces and housing types, responding to the existing geography of the site, providing a rich variety of typologies and tenure and is part of a major new community providing extensive open space and new community facilities in the Cambridge Southern Fringe growth area. The scheme consists of a hierarchy of spaces and housing types to suit different parts of the development. This approach gives form to existing infrastructure and a formal sense of arrival at the entrance to the site, before moving sequentially towards a more relaxed architectural language and looser density at the rear of the site, where it is integrated with the neighbouring countryside. High quality public realm and a series of pleasant communal spaces across the development have been provided. In the mews streets zone, the formal landscaping of the Great Court gives way to a series of parallel green connecting corridors that run perpendicular to the terraces, creating pleasant shared spaces and pedestrian routes between the houses. These “landscape ribbons” also provide a linear route through the development, connecting the formal landscape of the Great Court to the open countryside at the edge. Within the simple and controlled palette of materials used across the development, a common element is the base palette of “Cambridge” stock brickwork. A variety of split and partially projecting patterns is used to articulate scale, celebrate entrances and give emphasis to important townscape junctions within the masterplan. Panels of patterned brick are used throughout to model and give depth to what would otherwise be flat facades. This approach serves to support the hierarchy of streets and provide individual buildings with their own identity.

Credits

Architect

Proctor and Matthews Architects

Client

Countryside Properties

Main Contractor

Countryside Properties

Structural Engineer

Ramboll UK

Services Engineer

Ramboll UK

Landscape Architect

BBUK Landscape Architecture

Quantity Surveyor

Countryside Properties

Primary Use Class

Class C3 - Dwelling Houses