Cardigan Castle

  • ©
  • ©
  • ©
  • ©
  • ©
  • ©
  • ©
  • ©
  • ©
  • ©
  • ©
  • ©
  • ©
  • ©
  • ©
  • ©
  • ©
  • ©
  • ©

Application Type

AABC Conservation

Level of Award

Award

Region

Wales

Local Authority Area

Ceredigion

Information about this scheme

Cardigan Castle has been a prominent feature of the ancient port town of Cardigan since 1176 and was the birthplace of the national Eisteddfod. The castle fell into major disrepair during the 20th century and has now reopened following a 10 year repair and conversion project. After securing major grants from the Heritage Lottery Fund, Cadw, the Welsh Governments pilot Community Asset Transfer programme, and the Welsh European Funding Organisation (WEFO), a public appeal raised the matching capital funds needed. Buildings were re-roofed, masonry was stabilised, wet-laid slate roofing and timber box gutters were reinstated externally. Services carefully weave through complex archaeology which was discovered below ground during construction. Lime plaster finishes, decorative cornice-work, carpentry and joinery elements were restored. Wallpaper dating from the 1920s, originally printed using a wet on wet drum process, has been digitally recreated in the main house. The medieval curtain walls had been propped with enormous steel raking shores in the 1970s and required major structural and civil engineering works. Rock anchors were inserted and the walls strengthened by forming clusters of Cintec anchors to lock back the wall face and voids behind the wall were filled with semi-thixotropic grout. A local Cilgerran slate quarry was reopened to provide stone for repairs, and vast areas of wall were repointed (retaining the flashing line of previous structures which abutted the wall in the C19th).  The first phase of the project was to repair the curtain walls and undertake structural repairs to allow the removal of the steel shores. The second phase involved repairs, conservation and upgrades to the listed buildings. Conservation works covered all aspects of traditional building skills ranging from structural carpentry repairs, slate roofing, leadwork, masonry repairs, external joinery repairs and lime rendering. The compact site comprises of a visitor’s centre, restaurant, holiday accommodation, lettable spaces, education centre, covered event space, offices, volunteers mess, play area and landscape gardens. The project demonstrates what a committed community and regeneration scheme can achieve in helping establish a historic town as a visitor destination.

 

Credits

Architect

Purcell

Client

Cadwgan Building Preservation Trust

Quantity Surveyor

Parry and Dawkin

Structural Engineer

Fenton Holloway

Services Engineer

Martin Thomas Associates

Main Contractor

Andrew Scott Ltd

Landscape Architect

Nicholas Pearson Partnership

Ecologist

Wildwood Ecology

Project Manager

Baker Mallett

Primary Use Class

Class D1e - Museums