Fillingham Castle Gatehouse

  • © 1 Context view from south as existing - Photo Credit Wiles and Maguire
  • © 2 Context view from south as conserved - Photo Credit Wiles and Maguire
  • © 3 condition of Existing stonework - Photo Credit Wiles and Maguire
  • © 4 internal condition of the north range as existing - Photo Credit Wiles and Maguire
  • © 5 existing view of north range - Photo Credit Wiles and Maguire
  • © 6 Existing view of the south range showing large area of collapse - Photo Credit Wiles and Maguire
  • © 7 Existing windows behind the window protection - Photo Credit Wiles and Maguire
  • © 8 Context view from East as conserved - Photo Credit Wiles and Maguire
  • © 9 Context view from west as conserved - Photo Credit Wiles and Maguire
  • © 10 General view from north east as conserved - Photo Credit Wiles and Maguire
  • © 11 Completed north range 1 as conserved - Photo Credit Wiles and Maguire
  • © 12 Completed north range 2 as conserved - Photo Credit Wiles and Maguire
  • © 13 Detail of restored gates - Photo Credit Wiles and Maguire
  • © 14 works underway - sample panel of new stonework tooling types - Photo Credit Wiles and Maguire
  • © 15 works underway - New stone replacing missing areas over door - Photo Credit Wiles and Maguire
  • © 16 works underway - large areas of stone replacement - Photo Credit Wiles and Maguire
  • © 17 works underway - Collapsed section of south range rebuilt - Photo Credit Wiles and Maguire

Application Type

AABC Conservation

Level of Award

Award

Region

East Midlands

Local Authority Area

West Lindsey

Information about this scheme

Fillingham Castle was built between c 1760 and 1770, by the architect John Carr of York, for Sir Cecil Wray. On the eastern boundary of the park stands the gateway with attached lodges and walls. Built of local limestone ashlar, the archway is neo-Gothic in style and was designed by John Carr in c 1775. It is a simple balanced design of classical proportions but uses castellations and the motifs of a fortified medieval structure.  It clearly seeks to create an impressive welcome to the Fillingham estate, however fortunes of the Fillingham estate dwindled and were bought by the Rose family in 1949. The Castle and Gatehouse were in a poor condition and while investment was made in the restoration of the castle the Gatehouse fell into disrepair. It was still being used as a shepherd’s hut in the late 1960s, but by the 1980s the roofs had started to collapse. The decaying structure was slowly being re-claimed by the landscape and its context of being the original entrance to the Fillingham Castle was becoming lost. Conservation Architect Andrew Wiles was commissioned in 2015 to create a detailed set of record drawings to identify a scheme of conservation work for this Grade II* listed building. The study also aimed to see if a new sustainable use could be established for the site. The majority of the repairs were required to correct decay and structural damage that had occurred as a result of the failure of the lodge roofs. Weak areas created by window openings and a lack of tying in the mono pitch roof structures had pushed the west walls outwards. Rafters had detached from the back wall and the roofs fell in. Roof coverings were reintroduced and rooms were made weather tight. With only one viable quarry close to the site and with production capacity and the exact characteristics of golden limestone that was required, the mammoth task began of sourcing accurately sized stones that needed to be installed in a hit-and-miss sequence of different sized blocks, often in seemingly random locations, to make sure that the whole wall was not de-stabilized at once. There was also a wide range of different types of stone tooling that could be observed on the existing stone. There were stones with a regular punched grid, diagonal sweeps, curved sweeps and herringbone, with no discernible pattern to the existing arrangement. The decision was taken for the contractor to tool the stone on site, overcoming the challenge to decide which tooling to apply to which stone. Once the conservation works were revealed, the glowing new stone of pinnacles and the replica painted windows drew attention to the structure once again. Its subtle role is to remind local people that this was once a place of great prosperity that could attract the best work of eminent architects of the age

Credits

Conservation Architect

Wiles and Maguire Ltd

Client

Trustees of AG Rose

Main Contractor

Bridgett Conservation

Primary Use Class

Sui Generis - Other Use Class not listed above