Maggie’s Oldham

  • © Tony Barwell
  • © Alex de Rijke
  • © Jasmin Sohi
  • © Alex de Rijke
  • © Alex de Rijke
  • © Alex de Rijke
  • © Alex de Rijke
  • © Alex de Rijke
  • © Alex de Rijke
  • © Alex de Rijke
  • © Alex de Rijke
  • © Alex de Rijke
  • © Alex de Rijke
  • © Alex de Rijke
  • © Jasmin Sohi
  • © Jasmin Sohi
  • © Jasmin Sohi
  • © Jasmin Sohi
  • © Alex de Rijke
  • © Jasmin Sohi

Application Type

Civic Trust Awards

Level of Award

Commendation

Region

North West

Local Authority Area

Manchester

Information about this scheme

The design of Maggie’s Oldham is less about form and more about content. A simple yet sophisticated wooden box of therapeutic surprises. Supported on slender columns and reached across a bridge, the building floats above a garden framed by pine, birch and tulip trees. From a central oasis, a tree grows up through the building, bringing nature inside. On entering, the visitor is met with a space, light and unexpected views down to the garden below, up to the sky, and out to the Pennine horizon. The building is arranged with the Pennine horizon view to the north and kitchen with terrace to the south. Consultation rooms, toilets and staff rooms are contained in a ‘thick wall’ to the east. The plan is free flowing but articulated to give privacy for each of the many overlapping functions. The bright yellow floor reminds visitors of sunnier places and is also kind to cancer sufferers undergoing pervasive treatments. The use of wood at Maggie’s Oldham is part of a bigger design intention to reverse the norms of hospital architecture and is the first building constructed from sustainable tulipwood cross laminated timber. The walls and roof are visibly structured and form an exquisite natural timber finish internally, carefully detailed to bring out its natural beauty. The slatted acoustic ceiling was created from offcuts from the CLT fabrication process, ensuring no waste.  Cancer and the use of wood have been considered simultaneously. E.g. those undergoing chemotherapy suffer neutropenia and feel pain on touching cold objects. Therefore, oak rather than metal door handles have been used. Wood fibre insulation ensures a breathable, healthy environment whilst the huge window frames are American white oak. Externally the building is draped in custom-fluted, thermally modified tulipwood, like a surreal curtain. The flexibility of the building means that the various workshops and sessions that Maggie’s run are all well-catered for.

Credits

Architect

dRMM

Client

Maggie's

Landscape Architect

dRMM & Rupert Muldoon

Quantity Surveyor

Robert Lombardelli Partnership

Main Contractor

F Parkinson

Services Engineer

Atelier Ten

Structural Engineer

Booth King Partnership

Interior Designer

dRMM

Artist

Inside Outside

Project Funder

Stoller Charitable Trust

Lighting Design

Atelier Ten

Environmental Consultant

Atelier Ten

CDMC

Maggie's & CDM Scotland

Primary Use Class

Class D1a - Medical/Health Service