Quay Place – Regeneration of St Mary at the Quay

  • © With night-time traffic streaming past, Quay Place provides a beacon of light and an oasis of calm in contemporary Ipswich, October 2016.  Credit Andy Marshall
  • © Aerial view of site, October 2016. Credit Andy Marshall
  • © Site viewed from east. Credit Andy Marshall
  • © Aerial view of extension, October 2016. Credit Andy Marshall
  • © Exterior showing south east corner where old meets new, October 2016. Credit Andy Marshall
  • © Extension at night. Credit Andy Marshall
  • © Before - St Mary at the Quay, 1974. Credit CCT
  • © Before - St Mary at the Quay interior facing east 2012. Credit Andy Marshall
  • © South elevation 2016. Credit Andy Marshall
  • © Joinery repairs 2014. Credit Rebecca Tate
  • © Quay Place looking east. Credit Andy Marshall
  • © Column repairs 2015. Credit CCT
  • © Construction of the new extension provides training opportunities, 2015. Credit Rebecca Tate
  • © Quay Place during launch event, October 2016. Credit Iona Hodgson
  • © Interior of south aisle showing mezzanine and servery, October 2016. Credit Andy Marshall
  • © View of mezzanine from south east. Credit Andy Marshall
  • © View of mezzanine walkway. Credit Andy Marshall
  • © View from extension lobby to south aisle. Credit Andy Marshall
  • © Mindfulness workshop in new extension, 2016. Credit Andy Marshall
  • © Site archaeology display at launch, leading to schools and adult archaeology clubs at Quay Place. Credit Iona Hodgson

Application Type

AABC Conservation

Level of Award

Award

Region

Eastern

Local Authority Area

Ipswich

Information about this scheme

Quay Place is the realisation of a £5.1m scheme to rescue the ‘at risk’ Grade II* medieval church, St Mary at the Quay, Ipswich, transforming it into a unique wellbeing and heritage centre. Delivered in partnership between the Churches Conservation Trust and Suffolk Mind, it is an exemplar conservation project, combining traditional approaches with cutting-edge innovation, and providing varied community engagement and training opportunities. The principle objective of conservation and repairs to this historic building was the retention of original material. Where the building fabric showed evidence of decay which would result in harm (structural, rot or water), these sections were repaired to match the original material in form and detail, combining traditional methods with innovative approaches where appropriate. The result is an uplifting, multi-purpose centre that secures the future of this important Ipswich landmark. Capital works consisted of repairs to roof and historic fabric, where the principle objective of conservation was the retention of original material, and combining traditional methods with innovative approaches where appropriate.  An integral part of the development scheme was the insertion of a new mezzanine floor in the original church building and the addition of a contemporary, but complementary, two-storey extension to the southeast corner of the churchyard.  As a conservation project, it exemplifies how high-quality conservation coupled with imaginative new-build solutions can enable the repurposing of underused heritage assets, providing opportunities for public engagement and learning, and demonstrating how our historic buildings can enhance individual and community wellbeing. Extensive community consultation during project-development had unlocked opportunities for collaboration on the activities and interpretation programme: a programme designed not only to tell the story of the church, but also to encourage the long-term engagement of volunteers and local groups.   As a result, the project has generated a set of interactive interpretation installations.  These include a rope and knot board reflecting Ipswich’s maritime past, café tables created in collaboration between local craftspeople, school children and volunteers, and a dock play table providing a visual map of Ipswich’s working docks.
 

Credits

Client

The Churches Conservation Trust

Client

Suffolk Mind

Architect

Molyneux Kerr Architects

Structural Engineer

Sinclair Johnston & Partners

Main Contractor

Bakers of Danbury

Quantity Surveyor

Academy Consulting

Primary Use Class

Class D2 - Assembly and Leisure