Tate St Ives

  • © Context   Photography (c)Hufton&Crow
  • © Jamie Fobert Architects exterior  Photography (c)Hufton&Crow
  • © Jamie Fobert Architects interior  Photography (c)Hufton&Crow
  • © Jamie Fobert Architects exterior  Photography (c)Hufton&Crow
  • © Jamie Fobert Architects exterior  Photography (c)Hufton&Crow
  • © Jamie Fobert Architects interior  Photography (c)Hufton&Crow
  • © Jamie Fobert Architects interior  Photography (c)Hufton&Crow
  • © Jamie Fobert Architects exterior  Photography (c)Hufton&Crow
  • © Jamie Fobert Architects exterior  Photography (c)Hufton&Crow
  • © Jamie Fobert Architects interior  Photography (c)Hufton&Crow
  • © Work to the existing building by Evans and Shavlev  Photography (c)Tate St Ives
  • © Context   Photography (c)Hufton&Crow

Application Type

Civic Trust Awards

Level of Award

Award

Region

South West

Local Authority Area

Cornwall

Information about this scheme

Following its opening in 1993, Tate St Ives became a model for how museums connect to their location and community. It engaged and inspired local visitors, as well as attracting people from around the UK and across the world. Such was its popularity that the original building lacked the necessary facilities and scale. Therefore, a new building project was conceived. From the outset, the client developed the project through close consultation with the local community. Refurbishment works and interventions to the existing building have been carried out, including two new learning spaces and a major extension to increase the space for visitors to see art and to provide compact, efficient art handling and staff accommodation has been added. The coastal setting and vernacular of St Ives informed the design of the 1,325m2 new building. The focus was to create as large a gallery volume as the site would allow. Entirely excavated into the hillside, the new gallery extends in a continuous journey the existing gallery sequence. Six large light chambers capture St Ives’ particular light, which is diffused through 1.5m deep beams into the gallery below. The new gallery is a column-free, 500m2 volume, neutral in detail to allow for the varied practices of contemporary art, with the ability to be configured into multiple arrangements of up to six smaller galleries. The exposed roof and light chambers of the submerged gallery provided an opportunity for an additional element to the project that was not in the brief.  A gentle set of stairs and public spaces weave between the elevated granite volumes of the light chambers amid Cornish wildflowers, meeting an existing path which leads to the sea. At the top of the site, a pavilion contains a loading bay, collection care studio, offices and visitor facilities—crucial to the smooth function of the Gallery’s operations. In reference to the history of ceramicists in St Ives, the building is clad in shiplapped ceramic tiles, which are glazed in layers of blue-green tones to echo the sea and the sky. Since it reopened, Tate St Ives offers twice as much space for visitors to see art, with gallery space increased from 500 to 1,095m2. Tate St Ives is now able to give a permanent presence to the iconic 20th century artists who lived and worked in the town, demonstrating the role of St Ives in the story of modern art, as well as bringing some of the world’s most exciting contemporary art to Cornwall.

Credits

Client

Tate St Ives

Architect

Jamie Fobert Architects

Structural Engineer

Price & Myers

Services Engineer

Max Fordham

Main Contractor

BAM Construct

Project Manager

Currie Brown

Original Architect

Evans and Shalev

Community Group

Tate St Ives Community Liaison Group

Primary Use Class

Class D1d - Display of Works of Art